Finding #crazywaystosave can make you happier this July Savings Month

July is Savings Month in South Africa, and this year the focus is going to be firmly placed on engaging our country’s youth with a theme of “#crazywaystosave.” The South African Savings Institute (SASI), with support from Absa and the IDC, launched July Savings Month 2019 today, with discussions sparking a national conversation on how everyone can find ways to save.

Facilitated by financial journalist Arabile Gumede, the breakfast featured leading voices in personal finance personal including finance coach Mapalo Makhu from Women and Finance; award-winning personal finance journalist Maya Fisher-French; Samke Mhlongo from TNC Wealth Partners; Nicollette Mashile from Financial Fitness Bunny and SASI acting CEO and My Money author Gerald Mwandiambira to provide tangible savings insights.

SASI Chairperson Prem Govender says, “There is an urgent need to equip young people with the savings know-how that can directly impact their earning power, wealth creation abilities and happiness. South Africa’s household saving rate has declined to -0.5% of GDP, while our household debt as a percentage of disposable income is currently 71.9% – meaning that for every rand earned, nearly three quarters is spent on debt.”

Govender cites low levels of financial literacy as a reason behind South Africa’s low savings rate and growing credit addiction. “The young tend to save less and spend more. With 20 million people aged between 15 and 34, South Africa has a young population that are increasingly relying on credit. We can blame issues such as black tax, high unemployment, a rising tax burden and inflation – but we also must fundamentally stop living beyond our means and drive a savings culture to break the cycle of inter-generational debt.”

According to Thami Cele, Head of Savings and Investments at Absa Retail and Business Banking, the ‘Crazy Ways to Save’ idea was born out of a need to engage the youth and approach savings differently to get better results. Cele highlighted ABSA Happiness Index research which has identified a direct correlation between savings and the levels of consumer happiness. “We have been studying the underlying factors that ‘make us save’ and the impact that saving can have on overall well-being and happiness.”

The ABSA research found that top factors that improve South Africans’ overall happiness include:
• 92% – having confidence that my family is provided for
• 92% – the ability to afford the necessities in life
• 92% – leading a healthy life
• 91% – saving for the future

“Simply stated, being financially prepared for the future, staying in control of their savings and being satisfied that their families are well provided for are the key drivers to happiness,” says Cele. “Ultimately, 45% of South Africans who are currently saving are significantly happier than their counterparts, whilst 71% of South Africans who claim to have 4 or more months’ salary saved are happier than their counterparts.”

Gerald Mwandiambira, SASI acting CEO, says, “Saving when you’re already under financial pressure can often seem like an impossible task. While you may come up with many crazy ways to save money, from making your own laundry soap to stocking up on condiments at the fastfood store to literally freezing your credit cards – the fundamental truth of compound interest is that money makes money and it’s vital to have a short, medium and long-term plan, to be educated about the tools you can use and to put your savings to work to ensure your financial stability and happiness.”

According to Mwandiambira, saving is not necessarily dependent on income; it is largely dependent on willpower and discipline. “Hiccups in your commitment to saving, if you don’t plan this out carefully, will lead to a feeling of failure. Talking to a financial adviser early to help simplify the complexities around saving and investing will help you to plan your financial future while pointing out any gaps in your plan.”

Mwandiambira concludes that it’s important for South Africans to move away from negativity around our savings rate and look towards developing innovative savings alternatives and reinforcing positive savings behaviour – which the Happiness Index shows leads to a happier nation. “Cultivating a culture of savings and promoting alternative savings solutions in all spheres remains the focus of SASI and our dedicated partners. Savings Month has been designed to remind consumers to strive towards financial freedom and move away from remaining continuously vulnerable. Let’s find the #crazywaystosave!”

(ENDS)

Saving step by step – advice from SASI experts and partners

Step one: Set clear financial goals.
You need to plan your short-term goals (less than five years) where saving money is more important than growing it. This can be settling debt and putting an emergency fund in place or saving for an overseas holiday. Your medium-term goals (five to ten years) require you to balance the security of your money with growing its returns. This may include making provision for your children’s education or buying a car. Your long-term goals (more than ten years) are where the returns on the money you have accumulated count most – here we’re talking retirement planning or settling your homeloan.

Step two: Track your spending and create a realistic budget
You must have a very clear picture of how much money you earn, what you spend it on and how much can be saved. It also helps you cut expenses. Part of this budget exercise is to face the harsh reality of the dent debt makes in our cashflow situation.

Step three: Get rid of toxic debt.
As far as expenses in your budget go, there is a huge difference between a food bill and debt repayment. Hopefully, your debt had a very relevant purpose initially, but repaying it at a high interest rate makes an ugly dent in a monthly budget. Focus on one debt at a time, focusing first on those with the highest interest rates.

Step four: Plan for risks.
Build up your savings by having an emergency fund available for the next time you face some unexpected nasty financial surprise. This is where insurance also becomes a critical tool in your financial plan: it gives you the opportunity to transfer the risk.

Step five: Start saving and find your #crazywaystosave
You have identified your goals, used your budget to determine and free up excess funds by getting rid of debt and managing your expenses, and covered your risks as best as possible. Now the only thing left is to do is invest your surplus funds to reach your financial goals and dreams.

#Crazywaystosave from SASI

1. Financial Wellness Days: Ask your employer to give mandatory time off to review your finances with a Financial Planner once a year. Regular meetings with a Certified Financial Planning Professional will help you remain in control of your finances.
2. Automated Savings: Debit orders to Savings Accounts allow automated saving. You can set up debit orders Tax Free Savings Accounts (TFSA), 32 Day Notice Accounts and Unit Trust Accounts.
3. 13th Cheque: Ask your employer payroll to save for a 13th cheque paid to you in December by lowering your salary. This extra pay cheque will allow you to ride out the Festive Period and New Year expenses without major impact on your finances.
4. Pension Fund Contributions: When starting a new job, ask your employer to default to the highest allowable retirement fund contribution percentage of your income. You can also ask your employer to review your current contribution. Best of all, all retirement funding contributions are tax deductible annually up to R 350 000.
5. Group Savings: Start of Join a Stokvel or Investment Club with family and friends. The group will encourage you and allow you to develop the discipline required to be a regular saver.
6. Savings Buddy: Ask a friend to be a savings buddy whom you meet with regularly to discuss your savings journey. By holding each other accountable, you can help each other to grow wealth.
7. Have the money discussion with your partner: Some people are conservative while others are free spirits when it comes to managing money. The truth is that talking about money makes many people feel uncomfortable, and couples may be inclined to avoid financial discussions because they fear the disagreements that may arise. However, by talking openly and honestly about money, couples can establish common grounds despite their differing money styles.
8. Baby Gifts: You can seed a child’s future savings by requesting baby gifts of cash to deposit into TFSA or even taking out a Retirement Annuity (RA) for a baby.
9. Children: Open Tax-Free Savings Accounts for all your children to maximize the benefit they receive from these accounts. Set up debit orders to contribute to these accounts as they grow up together with cash gifts they receive on birthdays etc. You can encourage grandparents and other family to also contribute regularly.
10. Domestic Help: Set up a Savings account or Retirement Annuity for your domestic helper. These important members of our families are often forgotten in future planning.
11. Retirement Fund Statement: By receiving your retirement fund statements monthly or quarterly, you can be encouraged to keep track of your savings to ensure that you have sufficient income when you retire.
12. Financial Products and Insurance: Shop around and use a financial institution that rewards consistent savers either through a high savings interest rate or cash back for no claims.

Focus on alternative savings during July Savings Month

The 2017 SASI (South African Savings Institute) July Savings Month was launched today in Sandton by Orlano Makubela, Chief Director of Financial Investments and Savings at National Treasury, and Sazini Mojapelo, Group Head of Citizenship at Barclays Africa, with a focus on encouraging alternative savings solutions. A panel of industry experts discussed developing alternative mechanisms to help South African consumers, already under pressure and over-indebted, to save.

Absa partnered with the South African Savings Institute (SASI) to launch National Savings Month, joining anchor sponsor the IDC and other long term partners across the financial services industry. Mojapelo says, “Our decision to partner with the South African Savings Institute echoes our commitment to Shared Growth through which we use our resources, the talents of our people and our expertise to make a positive difference in society. One of our commitments in this regard is Financial Inclusion, which includes financial literacy training, and looks to encourage South Africans to recognise the importance of saving and to save.”

SASI Chairperson, Prem Govender, says that following South Africa’s ratings downgrade and subsequent effects on the economy, consumers will increasingly be under financial pressure and need to improve both knowledge and attitudes to saving. “Savings Month has been designed to remind consumers, via the media and other channels, to strive towards financial freedom or remain continuously vulnerable. Cultivating a culture of savings and promoting alternative savings solutions in all spheres of life is our focus for 2017.”

SASI believes employers can also play an important role.  “Many South Africans are struggling to save not only due to income challenges, but also the lack of willpower and commitment. In terms of alternative savings solutions, we are involving employers this year and suggesting ways to facilitate or automate the savings process for those with an income, such as garnish savings options into a tax free saving account and 13th cheques structured as a savings tool.”

Gerald Mwandiambira, SASI acting CEO, emphasized the importance of people having a savings buffer in tough economic times. “Research shows that savers with a buffer enjoy improved emotional wellbeing, greater resilience to external market shocks and, importantly, an increase in productivity at work. We need employers to get involved in the savings process by assisting with automated savings programmes, especially considering that financially stable employees make productive employees.”

Mojapelo agreed, saying, “Persistent unemployment and the rising costs of living, made worse by historical spatial development patterns, means the average lower income household faces far greater pressures than many of us imagine. For those that can save, it is important that they use all the instruments available to improve their long-term financial sustainability. The responsibility for enacting these critical behavioral changes is a shared one, and we see a role for individuals, financial services providers but also for employers and HR professionals. Employers have a significant role to play in guiding their employees to make those small behavioral changes. HR professionals should be recommending tweaks to employees such as regularly reviewing and adjusting their pension fund contributions. They should also be educating employees to start building a savings buffer in case things go wrong.”

SASI has been dedicated to developing a robust culture of saving in South Africa since 2001. Govender says, “According to South African Reserve Bank (SARB) figures, in the last 16 years we have seen a decline in our savings rate, reaching a record low of -2.70 in 2013. However, we are now seeing small increases off a very low base, with the Household Saving Rate in South Africa increasing to -0.30 percent in the first quarter of 2017 from -0.50 percent in the fourth quarter of 2016.”

Govender further highlights that we are starting to see an overall reduction in household debt. The SARB bulletin for the first quarter of 2017 shows that, on an annual basis, growth in household debt slowed from 4.6% in 2015 to 3.9% in 2016, and the ratio of household debt to disposable income edged lower from 76.9% to 74.4% over the same period. “Recent improvements in the debt rate can be attributed to The National Credit Amendment Act 2016, which has imposed more stringent affordability requirements on borrowers, as well as a Nation that has simply used up all available credit,” says Govender. “Young South Africans are increasingly relying on credit to provide for basic needs, and there is a growing culture of people living way beyond their means and getting trapped in a cycle of short-term debt. Financial literacy education from an early age is vital to counteract this trend.”

Govender believes that we need to move away from negativity around South Africa’s savings rate to developing innovative savings alternatives and reinforcing positive savings behaviour. “Every Savings Month we work with our partners, including the large financial institutions that play such an important role in sharing knowledge, to find ways to educate and empower South Africans to save more. The household savings agenda is a key national priority. We believe that South Africans can save and invest more domestically for the greater good of our economy. As we sit in a technical recession, it is a fact that domestic savings can be a driver of internal economic growth. There has never been a better time to save than now.”

Alternative Savings Methods – Tips from SASI to help you save

Saving is not only dependent on income, it is largely dependent on willpower and discipline.
These solutions allow savers to have willpower and discipline by passing it on to others.

  1. Set a Target: The reason why many of us do not save is because we do not have set targets. It is important to set and write down important savings targets such as an Emergency Fund, Holiday Fund and other targeted savings. Do you know your targets?
  2. Automated Savings: Debit orders to Savings Accounts allow automated saving. You can set up debit orders Tax Free Savings Accounts (TFSA), 32 Day Notice Accounts and Unit Trust Accounts.
  3. 13th Cheque: Ask your employer payroll to save for a 13th cheque paid to you in December by lowering your salary. This extra pay cheque will allow you to ride out the Festive Period and New Year expenses without major impact on your finances.
  4. Pension Fund Contributions: When starting a new job, ask your employer to default to the highest allowable retirement fund contribution percentage of your income. You can also ask your employer to review your current contribution. Best of all, all retirement funding contributions are tax deductible annually up to R 350 000.
  5. Financial Wellness Days: Ask your employer to give mandatory time off to review your finances with a Financial Planner once a year. Regular meetings with a Certified Financial Planning Professional will help you remain in control of your finances.
  6. Group Savings: Start of Join a Stokvel or Investment Club with family and friends. The group will encourage you and allow you to develop the discipline required to be a regular saver.
  7. Savings Buddy: Allow your partner or friend to be a savings buddy whom you meet with regularly to discuss your savings journey. By holding each other accountable, you can help each other to grow wealth.
  8. Baby Gifts: You can seed a child’s future savings by requesting baby gifts of cash to deposit into TFSA or even taking out a Retirement Annuity (RA) for a baby
  9. Children: Open TFSA Accounts for all your children to maximize the benefit they receive from these accounts. Set up Debit orders to contribute to these accounts as they grow up together with cash gifts they receive on birthdays etc. You can encourage grandparents and other family to also contribute regularly.
  10. Domestic Help: Set up a Savings account or Retirement Annuity for your domestic helper. These important members of our families’ are often forgotten in future planning.
  11. Retirement Fund Statement: By receiving your retirement fund statements monthly or quarterly, you can be encouraged to keep track of your savings to ensure that you have sufficient income when you retire.
  12. Financial Products and Insurance: Shop around and use a financial institution that Rewards consistent savers either through a high savings interest rate or cash back for no claims.

(ENDS)

www.savingsinstitute.co.za

#celebratesavers

Photographs: https://app.box.com/s/4w4q54wxqfdame9i19skn2wn97mqocbf

Speeches: https://app.box.com/s/4w4q54wxqfdame9i19skn2wn97mqocbf

  • Orlano Makubela, Chief Director of Financial Investments and Savings at National Treasury
  • Sazini Mojapelo, Group Head of Citizenship at Barclays Africa

For more information contact:

Tamaryn Brown on behalf of SASI
Plato Connect
Tel: 084 3510560
Tamaryn@platocomms.co.za

Obakeng Nyokong on behalf of Absa, Fleishman Hillard
Tel: 079 684 3623
Obakeng.nyokong@fleishman.co.za

 

SASI July Savings Month 2017 Launch

The South African Savings Institute (SASI) will launch its traditional Savings Month Campaign at a breakfast event in Sandton on Wednesday 28 June 2017 where the Minister of Finance, Malusi Gigaba, will deliver the keynote address.

 

“Savings Month is SASI’s national savings awareness campaign, and the theme for this year’s drive, which runs during July, is “Alternative Savings Solutions,” says Gerald Mwandiambira, Acting CEO of SASI.

 

Savings Month has been designed to remind consumers, via the media and other channels, to strive towards financial freedom or remain continuously vulnerable. “Cultivating a culture of savings and promoting alternative savings solutions in all spheres of life is our focus for 2017.” The Minister’s keynote address will be in response to these alternative savings solutions and SASI’s vision to improve individual savings in South Africa.

 

At the event, Barclays Africa CEO Maria Ramos will also share her thoughts on the state of savings in our country, after which a panel of industry experts will discuss ideas and thoughts on a blueprint to encourage individual saving in South Africa.

 

“South Africans generally don’t have a savings pool to tap into in times of emergency and tend to cash in their retirement savings when times are tough. For this reason, National Treasury introduced vehicles such as the Tax Free Savings Account in 2015 to encourage household savings. SASI welcomes this strategy and is encouraged to pursue this mandate even more aggressively. Hence a key focus of this year’s savings campaign will be to promote savings literacy,” says Mwandiambira.

 

SASI will be implementing a number of initiatives during July, aimed at instilling a culture of saving.

 

“As responsible South African corporate citizens, we want to demonstrate our commitment to economic sustainability and to promoting the financial well-being of all South African consumers. We believe the Savings Month activities will further the spread of the savings message across the country and provide the necessary information to assist consumers to make informed savings decisions.”

 

Events planned for 2017 Savings Month Awareness Campaign include:

 

 

Event Date Venue Audience
SASI Savings Month Launch Breakfast 28 June 2017 Sandton VIP Guests
Media Campaign 1 July – 5 August National Radio & TV Public
Communities Campaign 6 July – 30 September National Selected Communities
Varsity/TVET Campaign 6 July – 30 September National Selected Campuses

 

 

Savings tips to survive 2017

 

  1. Resist SALE, think SAVE! Clearly distinguish between needs and wants.
  2. Have a clear budget for your requirements in every month. Create a budget using the SASI budget tool or phone apps, available at NO COST.
  3. Use free online tools to track your spending and debt and know where every cent of your income goes.
  4. Pay cash for all purposes and don’t be trapped by easy credit – in fact, cut up those store credit cards!
  5. Visualise what you want to save for and start saving more.
  6. Service your debt and stick to the payment terms. If you cannot service your monthly debts discuss your situation with your credit providers before it is too late. Consumers can seek assistance from  a  registered  debt  counsellor  by  contacting  the  NCR  on  0860   627 627.

SASI 2016 Calendar

SASI is seeking Partners for its 2016 programmes.

Events requiring sponsors and partners include:

Proposed 2016 Projects

 Piggy Bank Project

Objective Message Tactics Date Project Life
Demonstrate Savings potential of young children.

 

Social Experiment SASI and Deposit Taking Partner

If children can save, so can adults. Savings is a habit and a deliberate choice.

Children to raise R500 each minimum target. Issue 10,000 piggy banks to learners. Pilot project in the West Rand.

§  Each Child gets bank account at partner banking Institution

§  Big Unveil at SASI July Savings Month 15th Anniversary Gala Dinner

§  If successful R50 MILLION raised

§  Train an “Entrepreneurship” educator in each participating school to leave lasting legacy in the community

 

March – June 2016 4 Year Project with plan to nationalize in coming years

Social Entrepreneurship/

Responsibility Objective: Teach Entrepreneurship to children and demonstrate savings capability. School SGB’s to receive income and new “Entrepreneurship” educators from this programme

SASI Resources 2
Project Value Y1 R250,000
Project Funding Partner Proposals Out

Metro FM Radio Show “FutureBright”

 

Objective Message Tactics Date Project Life
Bonang Matheba will host a 5 minute talk with the expert spokesperson in studio on Mondays at 11h15.  Listeners would have been invited to submit questions via Metro and FutureBright social media and online channels in the week prior relating to the topic at hand.  Competitions will be integrated into the content and listeners will be linked to further resources.

 

FutureBright Money Mondays – Brought to you by SASI, powered by SASI PARTNER

 

§  10” Opening Billboard, 10” Closing Billboard

§  30” Generic Spot

§  Expert spokesperson from SASI/Partner experts as relevant

§  Topical Financial Education Intervention on mainstream radio station

 

27 January 2016 13 Week Rolling Sponsorships

Social Entrepreneurship/

Responsibility Objective: An opportunity to the partner to engage with listeners and provide non product driven generic financial education. Social discussions on money that are not rooted in product sales are important. Testimonies from the listeners can also be used to illustrate knowledge and insights.

SASI Resources 1
Project Value Y1 R315,536
 

 

 

Project Funding Partner Proposals Out

 

SASI Youth Month

 

Objective Message Tactics Date Project Life
Youth Month Savings Insights to South Africa Youth. SASI Partnership to come up with bold statement in support of youth, recognizing challenges and proposing dialogue to move on. Youth challenges to saving and ways to overcome these challenges in a #FEESMUSTFALL environment. SASI to collaborate with Partner and Youth Leaders in Savings Campaign. §  Speaker slot at main Youth June 16 Rally for SASI and Partner

§  Media Interviews with strategic sponsor and Youth Leaders

§  Potential Entrepreneurship Fund seeding opportunity

§  Youth Account Deposit Matching opportunity

June 2016 4 Year Project with plan to nationalize in coming years

Social Entrepreneurship/

Responsibility Objective: Start long term initiatives to empower youth.

SASI Resources 2
Project Value Y1 R500,000
Project Funding Partner Proposals Out

 

7.     SASI 15th Anniversary Gala Dinner

 

Objective Message Tactics Date Project Life
Gala Dinner to Celebrate SASI 15 and raise funds. Celebration of New partnership with a sponsor for 3 years for our flagship July Savings Month. SASI still relevant and to celebrate SASI history §  Gala Dinner

§  Guest of Honour Founder Trevor Manuel

§  Minister of Finance

§  State Presidium if possible

§  Industry Stakeholders and previous funders to purchase tables

6 July 2016 Once Off.

Social Entrepreneurship/

Responsibility Objective: Acknowledgement of SASI and opportunity to reposition and plot a way forward.

SASI Resources 3
Project Value Y1 R200,000
Project Funding Partner Proposals Out

 

8.     SASI Durban July Youth Event

 

Objective Message Tactics Date Project Life
Youth Event at Durban July. SASI Partnership to come up with bold statement in support of youth, recognizing challenges and proposing dialogue to move on. Durban July associated with opulence and spending. Subtle messaging to educate on Savings §  Participation at major youth high traffic traffic event tbc

§  Activation opportunity for SASI partner

§  Media and publicity activities

§  Youth Voice and Social Media Campaign

2 July 2016 Once Off.

Social Entrepreneurship/

Responsibility Objective: Start long term initiatives to empower youth

SASI Resources 2
Project Value Y1 R500,000
Project Funding Partner Proposals Out

9.     SASI Annual Savings Convention

 

Objective Message Tactics Date Project Life
Second Annual Savings and Investment Convention Follow on successful Savings and Investment Convention and Topical Panel Discussion §  Exhibition

§  Activation opportunity for SASI partners

§  Media and publicity activities

§  Panel Discussion with Thought Leadership Theme

§  FMCG Participation with financial services

15 July 2016 3 Year Lead Sponsor

Social Entrepreneurship/

Responsibility Objective:With over 5,000 verified visitors in 2015 in just 11 hours, it is opportunity to engage customers, gather information and profile savings and investment products.

SASI Resources 3
Project Value Y1 R1,000,000
Project Funding Partner Proposals Out

 

 

 

 

10. SASI Womens Month Youth Event

 

Objective Message Tactics Date Project Life
Womens Month Event preferably with youth theme Durban July associated with opulence and spending. Subtle messaging to educate on Savings §  Participation at major youth high traffic traffic event tbc

§  Activation opportunity for SASI partner

§  Media and publicity activities

§  Youth Voice and Social Media Campaign

August 2016 Once Off

Entrepreneurship/

Responsibility Objective: Start long term initiatives to empower youth. With a focus on female youths.

SASI Resources 2
Project Value Y1 R500,000
Project Funding Partner Proposals Out

11. SASI Festive Season Savings Campaign 2016

 

Objective Message Tactics Date Project Life
Festive Season Savings Campaign National Roadshow promoting Responsible Spending at the end of the year §  Press Conference

§  National Mall Tour

§  Media and publicity activities

§  National Radio campaign

§  SMS and Social Media Campaign

§  Account Activation

§  National Televeision Campaign

November 2016 – January 2017 3 Year Lead Sponsor

Entrepreneurship/

Responsibility Objective: Campaign to encourage responsible spending at festive period and encourage planning for the next year.

SASI Resources 2
Project Value Y1 R2,000,000
Project Funding Partner Proposals Out

12.  Other available Proposals Seeking Funding for consideration in 2016 if funding become available:

  • SASI Varsity FET Campaign

 

  • Entrepreneurship/Responsibility Objective: Start long term initiatives to empower youth. This programme targets over 20,000 students a year in tertiary institutions. With #FEESMUSTFALL this programme is opportunity to engage on different campuses every week of 2016. This programme is built on youth engagement and not necessarily product sales as there is financial education gap in this segment. This project will employ 3 full time staff and have branded vehicles once a funder is secured. This is a 3 year commitment and is resource intensive as it aims to meet a large number of students.
Project Value Y1 R3,000,000

           

  • SASI Radio Drama and CD Project

 

  • Entrepreneurship/Responsibility Objective: This is a project on edutainment. To emulate the success of Soul City Foundation with regards to HIV Education. This project is on financial education covering all aspects and challenges of managing money.The ain is to create radio characters brought to life in wider TV series. Also music CD to entertain and educate by leading SA Artistes.
Project Value Y1 R1,500,000

 

  • “FutureBright” TV Show

 

  • Entrepreneurship/Responsibility Objective: This is a project on edutainment. TV Format of the radio version. Weekly financial themes with skit, advice and calls to action. Sponsorship of episodes is available than sponsoring the full series. SABC1 approved project with outstanding sponsorship.
Project Value Y1 R4,500,000

 

 

  • The Stokvel Game Show TV Project

 

  • Entrepreneurship/Responsibility Objective: This is a project on edutainment. TV Game show held after national roadshow reaching up to 30,000 stokvel members to find contestants. Fun, music, financial education and cash prizes are amongst highlights. A pilot of the show is available for viewing. SABC or ETV platform pending sponsor.
Project Value Y1 R5,000,000

SASI July 2016 Savings Month

July is National Savings Month

logo_omSavings Month 2015
SASI will launch the traditional July National Savings Month Campaign on Thursday 30 June 2016. The Breakfast will be held at the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) Main Auditorium.

This year we celebrate SASI’s 15th anniversary and look back at the evolution of South African Savings during this period. The numbers are a challenge but instead of dwelling on the economy and poor savings culture, we CELEBRATE SAVING. We celebrate our anchor supporters The IDC, National Treasury and Old Mutual who have partnered with SASI since inception.

We cast the spotlight on ordinary savers who have found success in saving and share their testimonies. We also look at Savings vehicles available in the formal sector and discuss in a round table the success of new additions such as Retail Savings Bonds and Tax Free Savings Accounts.

We celebrate partnerships of SASI in the last 15 years as well as those individuals who have worked tirelessly to promote savings in the last 15 years.

We also look ahead at the future and consider a positive messaging that all can save and move towards Financial Capability through positive enforcement of saving.

In recognition of a tough economic environment, SASI will lower the tone of SASI July Savings month 2016. This year we will have no expo but a networking breakfast, round table discussion and recognition of saving success stories.

SASI will also hold savings workshops and join our partner in Starsavers as we Teach Children To Save.

Let us celebrate the savers of the last 15 years and look ahead at what will be!

#CELEBRATESAVING

For further queries or to join in the activities:

 

email: Joan@savingsinstitute.co.za

Savings Workshop 2010

The theme of the Savings Workshop on 2 September 2010, was Save for the Goal: The Path to Recovery. The workshop was sponsored by Old Mutual and was hosted at the SARB Conference Centre in Pretoria.

The presentations that were made are listed below:

 

Proudly sponsored by:
Old Mutual

SASI-ERSA Savings Workshop 2009

The SASI-ERSA Savings Workshop took place this year on 04-05 August at the Reserve Bank Conference Centre. It was jointly hosted by the South African Savings Institute and Economic Research Southern Africa. Among the guests were policy makers, regulators and financial practitioners.

The presentations that were made are listed below:

Click here to view the PR report (PDF doc – 309 KB)
Click here to view photos of the opening session.

Proudly sponsored by:
ERSA


Back to Savings Month 2009